There is more to female friendships than meets the eye

Female friendships appear to be foundational in terms of human relationships. The bonds between two female friends surpass that between a female and a male because it does not expect anything, it is just there for support.  This friendship appears to be a survival tool and helps females overcome and transcend ordinary life’s hardships. It provides sustenance to women’s emotional and spiritual lives in a way that men cannot provide their women. You might say interesting, but women have known this fact all along that is why women are never without their girlfriends.

  http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/24/science/how-hbos-girls-mirrors-the-spirit-of-sisterhood-in-nature.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20120424

Researchers have lately gathered abundant evidence that female friendship is one of nature’s preferred narrative tools.

In animals as diverse as African elephants and barnyard mice, blue monkeys of Kenya and feral horses of New Zealand, affiliative, longlasting and mutually beneficial relationships between females turn out to be the basic unit of social life, the force that not only binds existing groups together but explains why the animals’ ancestors bothered going herd in the first place.

In animals as diverse as African elephants and barnyard mice, blue monkeys of Kenya and feral horses of New Zealand, affiliative, longlasting and mutually beneficial relationships between females turn out to be the basic unit of social life, the force that not only binds existing groups together but explains why the animals’ ancestors bothered going herd in the first place.

Scientists are moving beyond the observational stage — watching as a couple of female monkeys groom each other into a state of hedonic near-liquefaction — to quantifying the benefits of that well-groomed friendship to both picking partners. Researchers have discovered that female chacma baboons with strong sororal bonds have lower levels of stress hormones, live significantly longer and rear a greater number of offspring to independence than do their less socialized peers.

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